Gaming Geek’s Log – 2014.12.26

Thanks to the string of holidays, I managed to put in several hours of gaming again. This time around, I’m going to talk about The Keep, Tokyo Crash Mobs and Etrian Odyssey Untold: The Millenium Girl, as well as some quick updates on Fire Emblem Awakening, Super Smash Bros., and Fantasy Life.

Fire Emblem Awakening

I mentioned taking a break from this game last time, but I ended up playing Fire Emblem Awakening a bit more. I managed to get rank B Support conversations between the second generation characters. So now I only have to work on the following:

– Getting the Rank A Support conversations between the second gen characters and Robin
– Getting Rank A Support conversations between all the parents and their children

The Keep and Etrian Odyssey Untold: The Millenium Girl finally managed to tear me off of this game, but I can totally see myself playing a few skirmish missions every now and then until I get all of the remaining Support conversations.

Super Smash Bros.

I queued up this game while I was doing some household chores to access the in-game music player and realized how the 3DS version’s soundtrack could have been much better. Super Smash Bros. Brawl on the Wii definitely had a better selection of video game music. After doing the aforementioned chores, I ended up beating All Star mode with Bowser Jr. and the Duck Hunt group, then put in some practice sessions with Link and Lucina. That lead to more realizations: (1) that my skill level is only at a point where not playing the game competitively for some time would result in a big drop off and (2) fighting games really are more fun if you’re playing them with other people. I had trouble beating off Level 9 AI controlled characters again as I went back to my bad habits. I guess I need to put in practice sessions regularly if I really want to compete in this game.

Fantasy Life

I’ve been trying to put in some time for this game but it’s gotten to the point of the tasks being too hard or too tedious that it’s become boring now. It could be a lack of direction – there’s just so many things to do here and a lot of the goals/tasks are related to each other so it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed with what you need to do when you’re already at high levels. I haven’t given up on this game and will just be taking a break from it.

The Keep

Boy, am I glad I got this game when it was on sale for just $7.99! For that price, I’d say it was worth it. It took me just under 10 hours to beat the game but it could have taken me longer had I not gotten lucky with a few of my hits. I’ll talk about more details when I do a review of The Keep (if I ever manage to get to it) but what’s worth mentioning is that the last couple of stages were really intense. The combination of the real time combat, the first person perspective, and being limited to grid-based movement resulted in a lot of tense situations for me. I also liked how your end game can be determined by the kinds of items that you manage to save up during your playthrough – I’ll just say that the final battle would have been easier if I was more careful with my item usage.

Etrian Odyssey Untold: The Millenium Girl

I’m glad I played The Keep first before heading into this game – playing The Keep made it easy for me to adapt to Etrian Odyssey Untold‘s movement mechanics, allowing me to focus on the other aspects of gameplay. Etrian Odyssey Untold: The Millenium Girl comes with two game modes – a story mode with preset characters and a classic mode where you don’t have the story but have the freedom to create your own characters.

This game can be brutal – I initially tried the classic mode as a preview of the game (I wanted to avoid any spoilers) and got my butt promptly handed to me by the first group of “monsters” that I encountered. I don’t remember what the monsters were exactly, I think they were either wild rats or woodflies. Think about it – I probably got my ass kicked by a group of flies – how bad is that? That’s classic mode for you, throwing you into the ocean without even any swimming tips. It’s probably what Etrian Odyssey veterans would prefer, but I’m new to the series so I’m glad story mode isn’t like that.

In story mode, I was initially grouped with a strong pair of characters that made the first mission easy enough to complete, allowing me to get a handle of the game’s mechanics and gain a couple of levels in the process. It also had the requisite tutorials that made sure I had the basics of the game down pat. I’ve been playing this game almost non-stop now, already hitting 10 hours in just a few days.

Tokyo Crash Mobs

I can’t end this journal entry without giving Tokyo Crash Mobs a mention. I would never have gotten a copy of Tokyo Crash Mobs had it not been offered as a Club Nintendo reward – it’s available on the Nintendo eShop for $6.99, an amount that I’m definitely not going to pay for this kind of game. I passed on several games offered as rewards previously – Kersploosh, Dillon’s Rolling Western, and several DSi games – but the quirky presentation of Tokyo Crash Mobs really grabbed my attention. I knew that I couldn’t pass up getting this weird game for free, and I’m glad that I didn’t.

Tokyo Crash Mobs is a matching puzzle game where you form a set of three or more objects of the same color. Unlike more popular games like Zuma or Luxor where you form sets of balls or spheres, you’re faced with matching sets of people called Scenesters that are walking in line by tossing/rolling other people into them – simply unique (weird) in a Japanese kind of way.

I had my girlfriend try one of the Challenge modes out and she got hooked! Despite having some competition in terms of using the 2DS, I’m happy to find a game that she can get into and really enjoy. I’ve actually spent some time with this game trying to beat her high scores and it’s fun.

And that does it for today’s entry. Later today, I might attend a local convention to get a couple of Street Pass tags for my games, I might write about that next week.

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